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January 17, 2008

Comments

robert walker

Whenever a writer of Ed Hoch'c caliber passes away, I can't help but feel a disturbance in the "force" or balance in the universe; it is as though a piece of the social and psychological conscience, and moral conscience of the world has slipped away from us. I met Ed at a conference once, a true gentleman, a fine author, and a credit to our profession.

Rob Walker

Jon Jordan

Every time I ever saw Ed he was smiling and happy. A truky wonderful human being and a wonderful writer.
The mystery community and the world in general is less of a place without him, but he's left a legacy behind to be proud of.

John Schramm

This is terrible news. He will be greatly missed. What an amazing writer and person. I loved hearing him speak as much as I loved his stories.

I wonder what his final tally on stories published in EQMM. I know he was getting close to 1,000.

I'm saddened.

Leigh

The legendary Ed Hoch had a story in every issue of Ellery Queen since 1973.

Last April when presenting Ed with Ellery Queen's Readers Choice award, Janet Hutchings pointed out that Ed had so many stories that they competed with each other, and if votes were tallied by author instead of story, he'd beat all other authors hands down.

James A. Rock

Ed Hoch has always been a friend and a welcome presence for us and for our publishing company. When we published our first book "Corsage" by Rex Stout in 1977 Ed Hoch was the first mystery book reviewer to write us and request a review copy and in 2007 he wrote an extremely gracious foreword for our latest non-fiction mystery related book, Mystery Writing in A Nutshell by Professors John and Andrew McAleer. We will miss his stories and his gracious presence.

Charles Ardai

This is really heartbreaking. I remember reading EQMM as a kid and seeking out the Edward D. Hoch stories as a sort of anchor, a universal certainty -- no matter what else was or wasn't in a given issue, you always knew there'd be a Hoch in there, like the prize in a box of Cracker Jack. I also remember Ed being generous and supportive and enthusiastic when I was just starting out and other old pros wouldn't have given a gangly teenage would-be author the time of day. Ed was kind to every writer I know. And as someone else mentioned, he always seemed to be happy. Anything you ever asked of him, the answer was always 'yes.'

I'll miss him. And the first issue of EQMM without him in it will be awfully strange, like Sesame Street after Jim Henson passed away.

Chris

I was fortunate enough to appear in the June issue of EQMM, and my two greatest thrills were seeing my name listed alongside both Ed Hoch and Lawrence Block in the table of contents. I was awed to be in the company of such giants; it's an experience I'll never forget. I'm sure Ed's stories will continue to grace the pages of EQMM for a little while longer, but Charles is right -- that first issue without him will be an odd one indeed.

Godspeed, Mr. Hoch, and thanks...

Amy Pelletier

I knew Ed Hoch on a very personal level. I've known Ed since birth, he was my Godfather and he has been a part of my life for 36 years. He and his wife Pat introduced my parents to each other over 40 years ago and they remained the best of friends after all of these years. It was always a highlight when Uncle Ed and Aunt Pat came to visit. They always had a "surprise" for my siblings and me. Coca-Cola was his trademark as was his love for french fries and my Mother's cream cheese roll-ups. She only made them when the Hoch's were coming to visit!! Its amazing to read all of the tributes written about him on the web. We knew him on such a different level, to us he was simply Uncle Ed. He was a world renowned author yet he was so down to earth. He was the first short story writer to receive the Edgar Alan Poe award and he was so proud of that award. We were proud of him as well. I'm still in shock at the news of his passing. He was family to us and he will be missed. It's a very sad day.

Amy Pelletier

I knew Ed Hoch on a very personal level. I've known Ed since birth, he was my Godfather and he has been a part of my life for 36 years. He and his wife Pat introduced my parents to each other over 40 years ago and they remained the best of friends after all of these years. It was always a highlight when Uncle Ed and Aunt Pat came to visit. They always had a "surprise" for my siblings and me. Coca-Cola was his trademark as was his love for french fries and my Mother's cream cheese roll-ups. She only made them when the Hoch's were coming to visit!! Its amazing to read all of the tributes written about him on the web. We knew him on such a different level, to us he was simply Uncle Ed. He was a world renowned author yet he was so down to earth. He was the first short story writer to receive the Edgar Alan Poe award and he was so proud of that award. We were proud of him as well. I'm still in shock at the news of his passing. He was family to us and he will be missed. It's a very sad day.

Josh Pachter

Ed Hoch was one of the dearest, kindest human beings I have ever known. Back in 1969, when as a teenager I published a short story in EQMM and was invited to join the MWA, Ed and his wonderful wife Pat took me under their wing. They always arranged to have me seated at their table at every Edgar banquet, made sure I was introduced to every author in attendance at every function, included me -- not just as a starry-eyed youngster but as an *equal* -- in every conversation. Ed's legendary standing as a short-story writer and anthologist is of course widely known. I, though, will remember him as a generous, kind, supportive, caring friend. Not even Nick Velvet could steal away my memories of this charming, delightful man....

Jim Morey

I first met Ed Hoch on Ground Hog's Day in 1964. I was a newly arrived advertising copywriter and Ed was a veteran public relations writer and general practioner at Hutchins Advertising Inc. of Rochester, NY. As we got to know each other, I marveled at his ability to grind out releases by day while retaining the energy and creative edge to pursue his first love–no, make that his second love, for wife Pat was surely his first–by night. His mystery stories had been published, yet acceptances had not quite reached the critical mass necessary for him to leave the business world behind. Within two years, Ed was gone from the agency but not from my life.

Let me share a few personal reminisences with you.

Ed and Pat were the social arbiters of a Rochester-based equivalent of the Algonquin Round Table. Many evenings after work, a group of us from the agency would gather at Ed's large table at a small restaurant and bar called the Chalet, a dimly lit den presided over by a witty, accordian-playing linguistics professor at the University of Rochester. There we sipped, laughed, and talked about everything: movies (another of Ed and Pat's passions), politics, eveything was fair game.

Over time, I learned a few things about Ed that many of you may not know. Example: Did you know that Ed had been an MP in the army assigned to keeping an eye on Chaplains? I still find it hard to picture this kind and gentle man thumping miscreant preachers and hauling them off to the stockade. Example: Did you know that Ed was accident prone? I vividly remember one rousing picnic where he fell, cut his head, zipped off to the ER, and returned, stitched and thirsty, to rejoin the other party animals. Example: Did you know that Ed an Pat had been married for fifty years? My wife and I attended a festive celebration they hosted in 2007 where we had a chance to meet some of the editors and mystery-writing friends the Hochs had collected over the years. Example: Did you know that Ed and Pat both loved to sing and did it well? Every Christmas they would attend an open house filled with my extended family members, young and old). We would always gather around the old upright piano and sing Christmas carols together. Well, not always. A few weeks ago, on December 30th, the open house took place as usual, the Hochs attended as usual (with Ed as cheerful and upbeat as ever), but somehow, lost in the rituals of eating and talking, we forgot to sing. When I learned of Ed's death, my first reaction was disbelief, followed by deep sadness, followed by "I only wish we had sung."

Jim Morey

Allison Morey Hays

It seems like Ed Hoch has always been a part of my life. Since I was little, Ed and Pat have shared a wonderful relationship with my family, the Moreys of Caledonia, New York.

I have countless memories of Ed and Pat over the years during winter get togethers, dinners, plays, Letchworth Park outings, and many more gatherings. I have a special memory of the time Ed arranged for me to meet Eleanor Sullivan during my college internship in New York.

Perhaps what I remember most is Ed himself, a humorous, gentle, insightful, inquisitive man with an infectious laugh, a man who took delight in others. He always took an "active interest" in me and everyone around him. In the early 80's, when I told him an "unusual" story about Halloween at a nursing home I then worked at, he was so intrigued, that he incorporated a part of my tale into a story he wrote.

Growing up, I've always had a love not only for the classics, but mostly a passion for well-written mysteries, suspense and good serial killer thrillers. Ed and I have had many highly animated, stimulating conversations about these books, authors, and also movies. He was great fun to be with, never boring.Our last discussion took place on December 30th at my Mom's (Fran Morey) open house when we discussed the movie, "Sweeney Todd," I brought my 15 year old son over to talk to Ed and Pat and we gushed about the movie. Ed said with a grin, "Of course Zach loves it. He naturally takes after his mother," and he chuckled.

Ed will be deeply missed. He was a remarkable man. Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to Pat, our dear friend!

Allison Morey Hays

Iwan Morelius

My nam is Iwan Morelius, Member of MWA since 1975, when i met Ed for the first time. A more open and friendly person you can never meet. Being a new member he welcome me and told me all about the organisation. Then we met many, many times in New York, England and also in Sweden 1981 at the 3rd Intern. Myst. Writer´s -congress there.
It´s a great honor to be able to say that you have had Ed and his lovely Pat as Friends.
Undfortunatly his short stories and books were not published in Sweden in the way we, his friends and we who know how good they were. Still, one of his best Friends in Sweden, Bertil Falk, tried very hard to get his books published. So far he succeded with four.
Living in Spain since 1989 I had a good contact with Ed since we first met and I will really miss him both as a Friend and as a very, very good author.
To make a travesty of what Duke Eliington used to say: "We miss you sadly!"
Iwan & Margareta (my wife)

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