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February 10, 2009

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Andrew Savikas

We don't track gender, but most certainly not "vast majority" men in attendance. *Way* more women than typical tech conference.

Liza Daly

I had to wait in line to go to the bathroom, and as a regular attendee of tech conferences that was shocking.

But I agree that the attendance at the romance novel talk was disappointing. There were a lot of important messages conveyed that publishers (and e-reader manufacturers) needed to hear.

Liza Daly

(Although please, no pink Kindles.)

Fizzwater

You all a bunch of dumbasses.

I.J.Parker

I've only truly become aware of some of the aspects of the gender division in reading materials since I've been published myself. Up until then, I'd believed that books were written for people, period. Romance novels seemed a side issue, much like pulp fiction written for men. But the situation now is far more complex and troubling to me, both as a reader and as a writer. We seem to have become a reading public divided by gender.

I used to make no distinction between books written by men and those written by women. Nowadays, I tend to reach more often for books by men, in spite of the fact that more books are written and bought by women. Most of the books by female authors tend focus on women's issues. I suspect many women consciously write for women only because it feels more comfortable or because sales are better. Frankly, this kind of one-sided approach to fiction bores me, and the very mass of books that fall into that category sends me running in the opposite direction.

Joe Clark

You seem to think it would be better if more women were doing what the guys were doing at the conference, i.e., attending guy-dominated panels.

Can you assure me that you are not taking male-attended sessions as the norm and would of course have welcomed a majority of males in attendance at the E-book-reading-habits panel?

What outcome are you actually advocating? That people stop being interested in what they are interested in? That boys be reëducated early on? That girls be?

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interesting read, thanks Sarah.

Joe Clark

Andrew Savikas, if you don’t track gender, how do you back up your claims?

If there are “way more” women but males aren’t the majority, aren’t you saying women were the majority? Why isn’t that confirmed by the eyewitness reports published on this blog?

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