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September 09, 2009

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Comments

Steve Oerkfitz

Just sickens me that this hack can do so well while so many other good writers can barely get published. His books read more like otlines for a novel rather than a finished product. No characterization, no sense of place.

Cine Cynic

I recently read a couple of Alex Cross novels and disliked both of them. I don't get James Patterson's strengths. I am interested in what you, Sarah, think about his books. Have you written about that before?

Barbara

I was amazed at the gullibility of the NY Times piece. Duh. And Betty Crocker tests all her recipes in her own kitchen.

Luise

I stopped reading Patterson some years ago, when he went to two-page chapters, etc. Somehow he's no longer what books are about, IMHO. He's an industry, as you mention, a factory. I guess he's profitable for Little, Brown, though it seems to be a huge lowering of standards for them. All very depressing. Happily, good writers abound and keep me reading.

Roddy Reta

Gee, a lot of James Patterson bashing on a litblog. What a surprise.

I guess this will be good practice for all the Dan Brown bashing that will happen next week.

LG

Well, it's not exactly hard to bash a guy who can't possibly be writing much of the stuff that has his name plastered on it in big, bold print. The news of his new book deal only makes it easier.

R.J. Mangahas

"I guess this will be good practice for all the Dan Brown bashing that will happen next week."

Yes, but there's a HUGE difference. Though not everyone likes Dan Brown, he at least still writes ALL of his own books.

It may have taken him six years to write the follow up to The DaVinci Code, but he was the one who wrote it.

David J. Montgomery

People who supposedly love books railing against James Patterson don't have a clue.

Patterson makes money for his publisher and for bookstores, money that helps them stay in business. His success helps fund the efforts of writers whom these complainers would presumably find more worthy.

If it weren't for writers like Patterson, the publishing industry would be in even worse shape than it already is.

Hell, Patterson and Stephanie Meyer are the only reason Hachette hasn't had to lay off employees. Should we tell the people working there to raise their "standards" and lose their jobs?

Simon Read

The money authors like Patterson make for publishers goes back into the multi-million dollar promotional campaigns for authors like Patterson.

Up-and-coming writers do not benefit from this. They get relegated to bookshelves with little promotion, while the likes of Dan Brown and J.P. get top placement in store windows and the backing of a huge publicity machine.

Margie Tripplette

James Patterson is a writer that is ahead of his time. I especially like the short chapter format. Most authors are heavy handed with their length of chapters.

Reading Patterson is an education in human nature, and his novels developes your anticipation so that you can pretty much figure out or guess what will follow, and discover that you were wrong (smile). His characters are developed to the extent that you understand why they do certains things. Keep those novels coming James!

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